Things I Wish People Would STOP Telling me about Diabetes

I started writing this: Things I Wish People Would Have Told Me When I Got Diagnosed post and then I stopped.  

People told me SO much stuff when I first got diagnosed, and so much stuff throughout all 20+ years of doctors appointments, support group meetings, nutritionist talks, and diabetic counselor discussions  that I just stopped listening.

Changing gears then, here’s a short list of the topics or phrases I wish lay people (not doctors or nutritionists) would STOP trying to tell me:

1. You can’t eat that!

Excuse me? I’m 24. As long as it’s not poisoned please refrain from shouting “you shouldn’t be eating that!” at me while I’m trying to enjoy my tiramisu. I am fully aware that my body cannot handle copious amounts of sugar, that’s what my insulin pump and carb book are for.

2. Diabetes is chronic.

Thanks, I claim that on my taxes every year.

3. Diabetes is nothing to joke about!

Yes it is. However, the absence of your sense of humor is nothing to joke about.

4. You’re just like everyone else! (Not to be confused with: You’re normal!)

Oh give me a break. This isn’t the hour of Barney I used to enjoy on Saturday mornings, this is real life. That statement implies a commonness.

If you were to say to me, “Abbi you have brown eyes, you’re very common!”

I’d say, “You’re right good sir! Please continue to share your wisdom!” But you didn’t. You’re generalizing things and pissing me off.

Last I heard all people didn’t check their blood sugars, carry around glucose tabs, wear insulin pumps, take insulin injections, etc etc.

I LIKE being different. Don’t take that away from me because it makes YOU feel better.

5. You’re normal!

I know.

6. They’re going to cut your feet off!

Oh really? I wasn’t aware you could predict the future. I guess if you COULD, you’d know I’m planning on dying waaaaaaay before they cut my feet off.

7. Diabetes is a serious disease.

In the words of James Woods:

“I get it. I got the concept.”

8. Maybe they’ll be a cure in your lifetime…

Maybe. I’d feel more confident about it if you didn’t say it with those big stupid puppy dog eyes which tell me you don’t believe it. And honestly, stop getting my hopes up. I feel like that’s just another one of those things people say to make themselves feel better, especially if they aren’t personally involved in some type of diabetic research.

9. You should really be doing that this way. (Or some variance)

I don’t walk around changing your “your”s to “you’re”s and “to”s to “too”s so please don’t think because your pancreas works properly that it makes you an authority on how many times I should check my blood sugar.

10. It’s so great how well you’re doing!

What? Did I just get dumped? Am I a recovering alcoholic? I’m not saying I don’t appreciate the good feelings, but be aware how condescending this can sound depending on your tone of voice.

11. Check your blood sugars.

Check yours.

12. What’s your AIC?

Do you even know what that is? If you can’t tell me the word that precedes those letters/number, you don’t need to know and you certainly don’t need to judge.

As childish as some may seem, these are my top least-favorite things to hear about or surrounding diabetes.

Any to add?

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5 Comments

Filed under List Posts-Diabetiquette, Random Extras

5 responses to “Things I Wish People Would STOP Telling me about Diabetes

  1. Trudy

    Any conversation, discussion, or well-intentioned statement that starts…… “Did you know……” is equally as annoying for the parents who are just loving each other and coping like any other family. No, kidding – I have no thoughts of my own – always comes to mind.

  2. ROF

    Ha and ha! After listening to people make these comments to others over the years I’d have to say you hit it right on the spot. Well done and well said!

  3. Pingback: Eyes, meet Stomach. | diabetiquette

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