Monthly Archives: October 2012

00-Diabetiquette

It makes me feel ridiculously special when someone asks to be a guest blogger on Diabetiquette or asks me to review an article or product of theirs. It is almost as though what I say matters.

I’m just kidding, it obviously matters. Just look at my huge Facebook following!

Well, a website called SlimKicker found me and asked if I’d like to try their new product next year, but first would I try the website?

slimkicker.com

Ah-ha, yes I would. 

I’ve tried online nutrition counters in the past with mixed results and I am more than thrilled to try this one! 

Also, look at the logo. Would I like to “level up my body”? 

I might not be entirely sure what that means but if it gets me anywhere closer to looking like the female (and albeit less Aryan) version of Daniel Craig’s 007–which is not natural–I’ll do it.

hotmandiet.com

As of today, I have begun.

I logged on to the website and registered myself. It asks you for your main goals and how you look now. It also promised that they’d never show anyone (you know, other than the team of market research people who are busily looking into your demographics).

Then you choose your diet/fitness goals. It let me choose to be a “just a normal” person which is just one of those things that makes me laugh. And by laugh I mean grit my teeth, but at least it was my choice.

Next, it tells you your results. Apparently I should be eating 1200 calories a day. That’s reasonable.

But, 75 carbs? Chunk that sucks. I think I eat like 45 carbs for breakfast… this is not looking good.

Later it asks you start adding the foods you’ve eaten during the day.

It gives you points (toward your reward for good behavior) just for adding foods but it does make fun of you a little for what you eat.

I added my typical soda and potato chip breakfast and got this message:

Well this is awkward.

I don’t know if I’m ready to commit to that.

As far as the SlimKicker website goes, it’s too early to tell. I’m going to keep plugging away and hit you back in a few weeks with the prognosis.

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Filed under Articles and Review

I’ll never let go, Jack…

Thinking about The RMS Titanic fills me with a weird mix of emotions.

titanicuniverse.com

My thought progression usually goes like this:

1. Oh man, I haven’t seen that movie in so long.

2. I wish Rose had said, “I will physically let go of you, but I will never mentally release you.”

3. Physics always wins.

4. That ship was huge.

5. There were real people on that ship.

6. I can’t believe so many died. I can’t imagine how terrible that was.

7. Now I’m picturing the sounds, the smells, the unrelenting cold…

8. Bummer.

9. That ship looks creepy now. Water ghosts?

10. I wonder if both of them (Jack and Rose) could have survived?

BAM! That brings us to October 2012. Myth Busters has settled my mind, they COULD have survived.

I am going to be honest with you, this Titanic talk is only vaguely related to what this post will be about which is being supportive.

absolute-tech.co.uk

I talked about getting yourself a support system before but I don’t think I properly conveyed how important it is, as a partner, to BE SUPPORTIVE.

If your child, or friend, or partner has diabetes (type one or two) I think it is your responsibility to support them even in the most simple of ways.

Some might disagree with me and say that it is only the diabetic’s responsibility to take care of him or herself. That’s fine. We don’t have to agree on everything, but I am judging you and thinking that you’re kind of an a-hole.

catspictures.net

 If it helps, think about someone with alcohol addiction.

 I’m a little foggy on the exact steps but I’m fairly certain that if an alcoholic went through all the trouble of realizing their problem, admitting they need help, and going to some type of rehabilitation or meeting and continued to hang around with their “old drinking buddies” in bars or where ever that it would SEVERELY stunt their personal growth and make it almost impossible to change.

It is the same with diabetics.

For someone who is recently diagnosed with TOD or TTD a major lifestyle change is in order. Gone are the days of eating candy by the pound, refusing to exercise and being carefree.

Let me share an example:

A coworker of mine’s wife has TTD. Her TTD has progressed to the point where she needs to take insulin injections. Her doctor has requested she lose weight which she is unable to do.

Her husband routinely comes in to my office and complains about how much ice cream/bread/potato chips/bagels/cookies she eats and then is genuinely surprised that she cannot lose weight and has to take injections.

luxecoliving.com

Are you freaking serious? I ask him every time he complains WHY he doesn’t simply stop buying the cookies/cake/ice cream so it won’t be around to tempt either of them.

He responds with, “Why? I can eat it so why should we get rid of it?”

wastingyourlife.com

This, of course, fills me with two things:

1. Rage.

2. A quote from Wayne Brady on Chapelle’s Show which I won’t write here but I will link to a video: Wayne Brady Chapelle’s Show. Go 10 seconds in.

Now I don’t actually say what I’m feeling because I’m from the Midwest, but I feel it hear it really loudly in my head on repeat.

Instead, I try to calmly explain how difficult it is to make these large changes in a world driven by food and sitting in front of computers (I realize this is ironic coming from me) and suggest that next time he does the grocery shopping maybe he should NOT buy the junk food. Not only will it remove the temptation but his wife will see that he is supporting her. Maybe that little burst of support will be the tiny extra push she needs to be healthy.

Something as small as knowing your partner has your back can make all the difference in the world.

powerfulstrongman.blogspot.com

I am going to have to defer to a different married couple for an example of what good support can do.

The husband was diagnosed with TTD. He decided to start eating healthy and exercising.

Both of them threw themselves completely into helping each other. They buy healthy food, she packs him a healthy lunch filled with vegetables, they walk together, they bike ride together. She only eats healthy foods now as well.

It was never a question of WHO would have to give up what. It was just unconditional, loving support. And it works. They are both healthy and happy. They look 15 years younger than their real age. The husband’s TTD is more than in check.

It changed the game from “newly diagnosed diabetic” v. “my former lifestyle”, “my family’s lifestyle”, “advertising”, “the world” to a more simple “us” v. “the old us”.

freechickenwings.blogspot.com

It just doesn’t get any better than that.

So if Rose had supported Jack more would they both have survived? Thanks to Myth Busters I think that answer is yes…

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Filed under How to: get diabetes., List Posts-Diabetiquette, Random Extras