Tag Archives: nutrition

I’ll never let go, Jack…

Thinking about The RMS Titanic fills me with a weird mix of emotions.

titanicuniverse.com

My thought progression usually goes like this:

1. Oh man, I haven’t seen that movie in so long.

2. I wish Rose had said, “I will physically let go of you, but I will never mentally release you.”

3. Physics always wins.

4. That ship was huge.

5. There were real people on that ship.

6. I can’t believe so many died. I can’t imagine how terrible that was.

7. Now I’m picturing the sounds, the smells, the unrelenting cold…

8. Bummer.

9. That ship looks creepy now. Water ghosts?

10. I wonder if both of them (Jack and Rose) could have survived?

BAM! That brings us to October 2012. Myth Busters has settled my mind, they COULD have survived.

I am going to be honest with you, this Titanic talk is only vaguely related to what this post will be about which is being supportive.

absolute-tech.co.uk

I talked about getting yourself a support system before but I don’t think I properly conveyed how important it is, as a partner, to BE SUPPORTIVE.

If your child, or friend, or partner has diabetes (type one or two) I think it is your responsibility to support them even in the most simple of ways.

Some might disagree with me and say that it is only the diabetic’s responsibility to take care of him or herself. That’s fine. We don’t have to agree on everything, but I am judging you and thinking that you’re kind of an a-hole.

catspictures.net

 If it helps, think about someone with alcohol addiction.

 I’m a little foggy on the exact steps but I’m fairly certain that if an alcoholic went through all the trouble of realizing their problem, admitting they need help, and going to some type of rehabilitation or meeting and continued to hang around with their “old drinking buddies” in bars or where ever that it would SEVERELY stunt their personal growth and make it almost impossible to change.

It is the same with diabetics.

For someone who is recently diagnosed with TOD or TTD a major lifestyle change is in order. Gone are the days of eating candy by the pound, refusing to exercise and being carefree.

Let me share an example:

A coworker of mine’s wife has TTD. Her TTD has progressed to the point where she needs to take insulin injections. Her doctor has requested she lose weight which she is unable to do.

Her husband routinely comes in to my office and complains about how much ice cream/bread/potato chips/bagels/cookies she eats and then is genuinely surprised that she cannot lose weight and has to take injections.

luxecoliving.com

Are you freaking serious? I ask him every time he complains WHY he doesn’t simply stop buying the cookies/cake/ice cream so it won’t be around to tempt either of them.

He responds with, “Why? I can eat it so why should we get rid of it?”

wastingyourlife.com

This, of course, fills me with two things:

1. Rage.

2. A quote from Wayne Brady on Chapelle’s Show which I won’t write here but I will link to a video: Wayne Brady Chapelle’s Show. Go 10 seconds in.

Now I don’t actually say what I’m feeling because I’m from the Midwest, but I feel it hear it really loudly in my head on repeat.

Instead, I try to calmly explain how difficult it is to make these large changes in a world driven by food and sitting in front of computers (I realize this is ironic coming from me) and suggest that next time he does the grocery shopping maybe he should NOT buy the junk food. Not only will it remove the temptation but his wife will see that he is supporting her. Maybe that little burst of support will be the tiny extra push she needs to be healthy.

Something as small as knowing your partner has your back can make all the difference in the world.

powerfulstrongman.blogspot.com

I am going to have to defer to a different married couple for an example of what good support can do.

The husband was diagnosed with TTD. He decided to start eating healthy and exercising.

Both of them threw themselves completely into helping each other. They buy healthy food, she packs him a healthy lunch filled with vegetables, they walk together, they bike ride together. She only eats healthy foods now as well.

It was never a question of WHO would have to give up what. It was just unconditional, loving support. And it works. They are both healthy and happy. They look 15 years younger than their real age. The husband’s TTD is more than in check.

It changed the game from “newly diagnosed diabetic” v. “my former lifestyle”, “my family’s lifestyle”, “advertising”, “the world” to a more simple “us” v. “the old us”.

freechickenwings.blogspot.com

It just doesn’t get any better than that.

So if Rose had supported Jack more would they both have survived? Thanks to Myth Busters I think that answer is yes…

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Filed under How to: get diabetes., List Posts-Diabetiquette, Random Extras

Eyes, meet Stomach. Part Duex

The Duex.

I have to finish this post. It haunts me.

I last wrote about how TODs and TTDs should read labels. It was conveniently followed up by my first-ever guest blogger, DrugWatch.com, and their advice about label reading.

I wish I could title this next section Portion Size, but I already did that before so I have to be slightly creative here:

Portion Size Estimation:

BOOM! Minds blown!

Thanks Troll Me for the photo.

That’s enough screwing around for now.

Lettuce get down to business!

Recognizing that you need to eat a certain amount of food, or a portion size, is step one of the better eating/more responsible eating.

The next: recognizing how much 3 ounces of meat is while you’re “oot and aboot” is a total mind mash and on the whole, annoying.

However, if you’ve already spent all that time learning how to read food labels and you’ve memorized how many servings of what you’re supposed to be eating per meal you might as well go the distance.

(Cue Michael Bolton song)

I am going to give you a basic food plan. If it is not completely accurate to your age, weight, and gender… well that’s not my problem. I said basic.

Fruits: on average you need 2 cups of fruit/day

Veggies: on average you need 3 cups of veggies/day

Grains: you need 7-ish ounces of grains/day

Protein: 6-ish ounces/day

Dairy: 3 cups/day

Fat: you get 6 teaspoons/day. Don’t be a jerk.

*Now would be a really great time for a “size matters” joke but I won’t go there today. Insert your own!*

A dietitian could give you a list of what a cup of something looks like, or an ounce, etc. For example, a cup of veggies is roughly the size of a baseball.

Do you regularly carry a baseball around with you? How about a woman’s fist? I am a woman, I do not have woman-sized fists. I have tiny little baby hands that can barely tie my own shoes. This means I wear slip on shoes and will not be getting enough fruit.

So I am re-doing this. For you.

Protein: you should eat 3 ounce portions. Formerly this comparison was a deck of cards. Unless you’re a magician I’m assuming you don’t carry cards around with you.

Look at how big your iPhone, iPod (not nano or shuffle), android cell phone, or compact (if you happen to carry one around) is. THAT IS CLOSE ENOUGH.

So take your meat, hold out your cell phone, and only eat that much. It shouldn’t be thicker than any of those things either. Now eat that twice a day.

Fruits and Veggies: Cup sized portions are recommended but I usually don’t see how many cups of apple are in the apple-shaped apple I’m consuming.

My suggestion for this estimation would be, eat as many veggies or pieces of fruit would fit in a coffee cup. Not the FRIENDS-sized coffee cups that have become so popular, but a standard coffee cup.

Eat two coffee cups full of fruit and three full of veggies per day.

Grains: Grains are kind of tough. For example, an ounce of grain is one piece of bread. So if you feel like knocking this one out with minimal effort, eat 7 pieces of wheat bread in the morning and call it.

If you like rice, you have to go by cups. A cup of rice is hard to guesstimate but you could pretty safely say that if you’re eating enough rice that fills the bowl made by your hands when you put them together (cooked) that it’s a little more than a cup. This is also 2 ounces of grain.

Pancakes and waffles are a great way to get grains in the morning if you don’t want to just eat your 7 pieces of toast. BUT, if the pancake is AS BIG AS YOUR HEAD, it’s too big. If it’s as big as half your head, that’s a serving.

Dairy: If you’re going the milk route this should be a no-brainer. You need 3 cups of dairy so drink three 8 ounce cups of milk and quit. If you need to know how many 8 ounces are, look at a normal sized glass.

If you like yogurt, eat one container per serving.

If you like cheese… well, think of a Kraft Single. That amount of cheese is a half of serving of dairy.

If you have a piece of cheese or pieces of cheese that collectively make up the size of your cell phone (thickness too) that’s a serving.

Ice cream always bites me in the butt. As much ice cream as you can fit in a tea cup, TEA CUP, is a serving. That does not seem like enough and  I think MOST people don’t usually eat just that amount.

Oil: Estimating a teaspoon can be easy because let’s face it, teaspoons are
pretty common.

If you don’t have one, a teaspoon of butter is a pat of butter. One tiny little pre-wrapped pat.  You only get 6 per day, choose wisely.

Chances are you don’t need to add any fat/oil to your diet because you’re getting enough in the processed cheeses, ice creams and Taco Bell that you eat daily.

Hopefully this will help you when you’re eating out or lazy and at home.

I also take requests in the form of comments. Any foods you’d like help estimating?

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Filed under How to: get diabetes.

from DrugWatch.com: Reading Food Labels and Diabetes

The Food and Drug administration has done us all a great service by putting nutrition labels on packaged food. Now we know exactly what we’re eating. Most of us have thanked the government by ignoring the labels entirely, but people with diabetes should be paying extra attention. By reading food labels people with diabetes can make sure they’re getting exactly the amount of carbs doctors recommend to keep their blood sugar at a healthy level.

When you no longer produce insulin because of diabetes it’s only too easy to eat unhealthy foods that will cause your blood sugar to rise to dangerous levels. This is called hyperglycemia. When patients hit these blood sugar peaks they can have a potentially fatal heart attack. Now nutrition labels on food seem pretty important don’t they?

If you have diabetes, your blood sugar before eating should generally be between 80 and 120 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter). This is called your fasting blood sugar. Two hours after eating your blood sugar should be lower than 140 mg/dL. If your blood sugar doesn’t drop below 130 mg/dL after three hours, you may be becoming hyperglycemic, and should take steps recommended by your doctor to lower your blood sugar. If you are taking medications to regulate your blood sugar levels, make sure to avoid the drug Actos. Actos has been linked to severe side effects like bladder cancer and liver failure. Filing an Actos Lawsuit is always an option if you’ve been harmed by this dangerous medication.

How much a food will raise your blood sugar can be predicted by the nutritional values on food labeling. The header on the label that’s particularly important is Total Carbohydrates. You can use this number to add up the total carbs for each serving of food you eat.

The American Diabetes Association says that sticking to 45 or 60 carbs per meal should keep you at a safe blood sugar level. Fiber is a good carb for diabetes. If a food has five grams or more of fiber per serving you can subtract half the fiber grams from the total grams of carbohydrate for a more accurate carb count.

It’s important to note that Total Carbohydrates and the other nutritional values listed on the food’s label pertain to that amount of serving and not the whole package. There is generally more than one serving per package.

For each serving you will also find the calories from fat, and the daily percentage you should have of each of the listed nutrients. These percentages are based on a 2,000 calorie daily diet. If your doctor recommends you should consume less than 2,000 calories these percentages will no longer apply to you.

William Richards researches and writes about prescription drugs and medical devices for Drugwatch.com.

American Diabetes Association. Taking a Closer Look At Labels. Retrieved from http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/what-can-i-eat/taking-a-closer-look-at-labels.html

American Diabetes Association. Carbohydrate Counting. Retrieved from http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/food/planning-meals/carb-counting/

**A note from Diabetiquette: This post pertains most to those lucky millions with type two diabetes or TTDs although it serves as a helpful remind to those of us TODs. We would like to thank DrugWatch.com for their insight**

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Filed under Articles and Review, Guest Blogger

Cool New Blog, I support you!

It has been such a long time since I’ve posted anything on “ye olde blog” and I apologize sincerely!

My dad recently became a member of the diabetes club and I owe him some good posts!

(Just in case anyone DIDN’T know, that is a member’s only jacket)

I think I’ve mentioned the fact that I work in a hospital in the Food Service and Nutrition Clinics. Because of this, I see a lot of nutritionists on a daily basis.

Two really great nutritionists from the hospital recently started a blog. I thought it’d be great to share the link here on Diabetiquette.

                         Nutrition Divas

 

 

 

 

 

Laura Isaacson                                                                                         Kelly Nuckolls

They don’t have much up so far, but as actual Registered Dietitians they will be able to offer some really stellar advice! And probably more accurate than mine…

I hope everyone had a great holiday season and more importantly, has stopped following the All-Potato-Chip Diet plan…

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